General College Recruiting Information

GET RECRUITED: Recruit-Zone.com

 

  • Grades Matter- We don't care how much talent or skill you have; you're no good to a college coach if you can't stay eligible academically. Why should they waste a scholarship or a spot on their team with a recruit that will never smell playing time because of academic ineligibility? It's in your best interest to prove, during high school, that you can take care of academics as well as athletics. Taking care of business in the classroom helps open up more opportunities during the recruiting process. All else being equal, having better academics than another recruit just may be the factor that sets you apart from other student-athletes. Grades are the most important. Don't slack in the classroom.
  • Attitude Counts- If you think attitude goes unnoticed by college coaches during the recruiting process, think again. Just one player with a bad attitude can infect the entire team. (Most people know the Terrell Owens and Eagles story) Most coaches would rather have a team full of decent players who work hard, who play together as a team, and know how to pull together when it counts than a team full of all-stars incapable of playing together. You need to demonstrate your ability to work hard, support your teammates, be a leader, and most of all be coachable!
  • Test Early- If you plan on going to a school that has SAT/ACT requirements, try to take these tests during your Junior Year in high school (if not earlier). The colleges will take your best scores from each section of each test. Most students see a 5% or more increase in their score when taking the test again. Often times College Coaches will offer scholarships in the fall of a recruit's Senior Year in high school, sometimes even sooner. If you've already gotten your tests taken care of and they know you'll be able to get into their school, it's that much easier for them to decide that you're a recruit they want.
  • Send Information- Too many student-athletes mistakenly think "If I'm good, someone will find me". Don't make this mistake! Guess What? College coaches can't recruit you if they don't know you exist. Put together a video, if possible, and send it to programs of your choice along with an athletic "resume" highlighting your achievements. Include stats, awards, high school transcripts, information on SAT/ACT scores, and letters of recommendation from coaches and teachers. Don't forget your contact information.
  • College Contacts and Visits- A college coach can only call or visit you after July of your junior year in high school. There are other contact periods that happen a few months earlier than this in football and basketball, but the "July rule" is pretty good in terms of a bench-mark. That means a coach can not place an outbound call to you, nor can he initiate a visit to your home or school specifically to talk to you about playing a sport at his or her college, until the summer before your senior year.  Remember, this deals only with outbound communication from a coach.

 

You can call or meet with a coach at any point in your high school career. That's right; you can call a coach whenever you want. The key here is that you are the one initiating contact with the coach and not the other way around. If you want to call a coach or visit a campus and set up a meeting with the coach, you may do so as often as you wish.

If you're a junior or a senior who has not yet heard from enough college coaches, it is imperative that you begin taking positive steps towards getting in contact with coaches as soon as possible. In other words, now!

High School TimelineClick To Enlarge

PLAY COLLEGE ATHLETICS

 

Playmakers believes that every athlete who desires to, can play sports at the collegiate level. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) consists of three divisions, each of which has their own unique academic requirements for eligibility. Please review them, as well as the Junior College requirements below. If you have questions about how to qualify for athletic eligibility in college, please contact us immediately. We are here to help all our student-athletes and their families during this process. And please remember, the information about collegiate eligibility on this website is just a guide; it is up to you to check with the NCAA and the NCAA Clearinghouse to ensure proper collegiate registration, qualification, and eligibility for your specific situation!

DIVISION I

 

If you enroll in a Division I college and want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year, you must

  • Graduate from High School.
  • Complete these 16 Core Courses in high school:
    • 4 years of English. years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher). years of additional courses (from any area above, language or nondoctrinal religion/ philosophy).
    • 3 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher).
    • 2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school).
    • 1 year of additional English, mathematics or natural/physical science.
    • 2 years of social science.
    • 4 years of additional courses (from any area above, foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/ philosophy).
  • Earn a minimum required grade-point average in your core courses; and
  • Earn a combined SAT or ACT sum score that matches your core course grade-point average and test score sliding scale (The higher your GPA, the lower your minimum SAT or ACT score can be. For example, a student with a 2.0 GPA must score at least a 1010 on his SAT or an 86 on his ACT. However, a student with a 3.0 GPA is afforded a minimum of a 620 on his SAT or a 52 on his ACT. For more information, visit the NCAA's reference sheet.)
  • Complete all necessary information with the NCAA Clearinghouse and college.

You will be a nonqualifier if you did not graduate from high school, or, if you graduated and are missing both the core-course grade-point average or minimum number of core courses and the required ACT or SAT scores. As a nonqualifier, you:

Cannot practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college

  • Cannot receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college, although you may receive need-based financial aid; and
  • Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

DIVISION II

 

If you enroll in a Division II college and want to participate in athletics or receive an athletics scholarship during your first year, you must:

  •  Graduate from High School.
  • Complete these 14 core courses in high school:
    • 3 years of English.
    • 2 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher).
    • 2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school).
    • 2 years of additional English, mathematics or natural/physical science.
    • 2 years of social science.
    • 3 years of extra core courses (from any category above, or foreign language, nondoctrinal religion or philosophy);
  • Earn a 2.000 grade-point average or better in your core courses and earn a combined SAT score of 820 OR an ACT sum score of 68. (In Division II, there is no sliding scale.)
  • Complete all necessary information with the NCAA Clearinghouse and college.

You will be a qualifier if you meet the academic requirements listed above. As a qualifier, you:

  • Can practice or compete for your college or university during your first year of college
  • Can receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college
  • Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

You will be a partial qualifier if you do not meet all of the academic requirements listed above, but you have graduated from high school and meet one of the following

  • The combined SAT score of 820 or ACT sum score of 68, or
  • Completion of the 14 core courses with a 2.000 core - course grade-point average.

As a partial qualifier, you:

  • Can practice with your team at its home facility during your first year of college
  • Can receive an athletics scholarship during your first year of college
  • Cannot compete during your first year of college; and
  • Can play four seasons in your sport if you maintain your eligibility from year to year.

DIVISION III

 

NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse requirements for eligibility are not used for Division III. If you want to play Division III athletics contact your prospective college regarding its policies on eligibility, financial aid, practice policies, and competition guidelines.

JUNIOR COLLEGE

The National Junior College Athletic Association (NJCAA) states that the following requirements must be met for entering student-athletes to gain athletic eligibility at a junior college.

  • A student-athlete must be a graduate of a high school with a duly recognized academic diploma or a General Education Department test (GED) that has been:
    • Authorized by a State Department of Education or other State recognized education agency, or
    • Authorized by a Regional Association as defined by the United States Department of Education, or
    • Approved by the NJCAA National Office after submission of a request letter, appropriate transcripts and documentation.
  • Non-high school graduates can establish eligibility for athletic participation by completing one term of college work passing 12 credits with a 1.75 GPA or higher. This term must be taken after the student-athlete's high school class has graduated.
  • Non-high school graduates who have earned sufficient credit for high school graduation status can establish eligibility for athletic participation by completing one term of college work passing 12 credits with a 1.75 GPA or higher. This term can be completed before the student-athlete's high school class has graduated.
  • Student-athletes classified under Section 3.B. or 3.C. above may be added to the eligibility roster after completion of the requirements in the respective Section. (May not be added until the term is over.)
  • Student-athletes who are completing high school and are simultaneously enrolled in 12 or more credits at a college are eligible for athletic participation with the completion of the NJCAA High School Waiver Form. This form must be signed by the student-athlete's high school Principal and the College President. This provision is applicable to only those student-athletes whose high school class has not graduated at the time of college enrollment

NCAA ELIGIBILITY

 

The NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse handles all inquires about individual initial eligibility status. The Clearinghouse web site is www.ncaaclearinghouse.net and this organization maintains and processes all initial-eligibility certifications.

 

To earn athletic eligibility at the Division I or Division II level make sure you take care of the following items in order to qualify for enrollment, scholarships, and participation:

  • Take the required number of NCAA-approved high school courses and maintain a sufficient GPA in those classes. Visit the NCAA Clearinghouse website to review the “List of Approved Courses” for Northgate High School. Our school code is 050666. Also be sure to take note of the different requirements for eligibility at Division I and Division II. High School Transcripts must be sent directly to the NCAA Clearinghouse. These documents cannot be faxed or submitted online.
  • Take the ACT or SAT test and earn a qualifying score. The ACT or SAT is typically taken during the last half of the junior year, although some take it earlier. The tests may be re-taken. ACT/SAT registration info is available in the Career Center, or online at www.act.org (ACT) or www.collegeboard.com (SAT). The PLAN and PSAT tests in the fall of 11th grade are pre-ACT and pre-SAT tests and both are good practice! When registering for the ACT or SAT, you must direct your scores to the NCAA Clearinghouse (code 9999) in addition to colleges.
  • Register at the NCAA Clearinghouse.
  • Complete the NCAA Amateurism Certification questionnaire at the NCAA Clearinghouse.
  • Review all relevant information at the NCAA Clearinghouse including:
    • Information for "prospective student-athletes" regarding Division I & II eligibility
    • General information
    • The “List of Approved Courses” for your High School. Ask your HS counselor for your school code.
    • “The Guide for College-Bound Student-Athletes”, which contains many more details concerning eligibility, recruiting, etc.
  • File a Domestic Student Release Form (SRF) after your junior year. The cost is $50, but may be waived if the ACT or SAT fee was waived. This lets the NCAA know that you’re a possible Division I or II athlete, and allows them to begin monitoring your eligibility. To do this follow these steps:
    • Go to www.ncaaclearinghouse.net
    • Click “Prospective Student-Athletes”
    • On the left-side menu, click “Registration Form for U.S. Students”
    • Complete the online application

 

REMINDER:

Register online at the NCAA Clearinghouse!

Prospective student-athletes may register with the NCAA Initial-Eligibility Clearinghouse on-line. By registering on-line, prospects will be able to view their eligibility information on-line, and will not have to call the clearinghouse for eligibility updates. On-line registration saves time, and allows prospective student-athletes to view their eligibility status up to six weeks faster than through the paper registration process.

General Information on the NCAA Clearinghouse Website:

  • Links to the NCAA website.
  • Core-course listings for high schools.
  • Online version of NCAA Guide for the College-Bound Student-Athlete.
  • Online information about Division I and Division II initial-eligibility requirements.
  • Online Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs).

Prospective Student-Athletes:

  • Submit your Student Release Form (SRF) via the Web.
  • Registered Students - Update your registration information (if necessary).
  • Registered Students - Check your certification status.

NCAA Clearinghouse
301 ACT Drive, PO Box 4043
Iowa City, IA 52243-4043
Phone: (877) 262 - 1492
Fax: (319) 337 - 1556

GLOSSARY OF TERMS

Contact occurs any time a coach has any face-to-face contact with a prospective student-athlete or the prospect’s parents off the college’s campus and says more than hello. A contact also occurs if a coach has any contact with the prospective student-athlete or his or her parents at the prospective student-athlete’s high school or any location where the prospect is engaging in competition or practice.

Contact Period is the time when a college coach may have in-person contact with a prospective student-athlete and the prospect’s parents on or off the college’s campus. The coach may also watch the prospective student-athlete play or visit his or her high school. The prospect and the parents may visit a college campus, and the coach may write and telephone during this period.

Dead Period is a time when the college coach may not have any in-person contact with the prospective student-athlete or the prospect’s parents at any time. The coach may write and telephone during this time.

Evaluation is an activity by a coach to evaluate a prospective student-athlete’s academic or athletics ability. This would include visiting the prospective student-athlete’s high school or watching the prospect practice or compete.

Evaluation Period is the time a college coach may watch a prospective student-athlete play or visit the high school but cannot have any in-person conversations with the possible recruit or the parents off the college’s campus. The prospective student-athlete and the parents can visit a college campus during this period and a coach may call or write during this period.

National Letter of Intent is the document a prospective student-athlete signs when he or she agrees to attend the designated college or university for one academic year. According to the terms of the National Letter of Intent program, participating institutions agree to provide athletics financial aid for one academic year to the student-athlete, provided he or she is admitted to the institution and is eligible for financial aid under NCAA rules. An important provision of the National Letter of Intent program is a recruiting prohibition applied after a prospective student-athlete signs a National Letter of Intent. This prohibition requires participating institutions to cease recruitment of a prospective student-athlete once a National Letter of Intent is signed with another institution.

Official Visit is a prospective student-athlete’s visit to a college campus paid for by the college. The college can pay for transportation to and from the college, room and meals (three per day) while visiting and reasonable entertainment expenses, including three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. NCAA recruiting bylaws limit the number of official visits a recruit may take to five.

Prospective Student-Athlete is the title given when a student enters ninth grade. It also applies when, before a student’s ninth-grade year, a college gives the student, the student’s relatives or their friends any financial aid or other benefits that the college does not generally provide to prospective students.

Quiet Period is a time when the college may not have any in-person talk with the prospective student-athlete or the parents off the college’s campus. The coach may not watch the prospect play or practice. The prospective student-athlete can visit college campuses during this time and a coach may write or telephone.

Unofficial Visit is any visit by a prospective student-athlete and their parents to a college campus paid for by the prospective student athlete or the prospect’s parents. The only expense the prospective student-athlete can receive from the college is three complimentary admissions to a home athletics contest. The prospect may make as many visits as he or she likes and may take the visits at any time. The only time the prospective student-athlete cannot talk with a coach during an unofficial visit is during a dead period.

Verbal Commitment is the phrase used to describe a college-bound student-athlete’s commitment to a school before he or she is able to sign a National Letter of Intent. A college-bound student athlete can announce a verbal commitment at any time. While verbal commitments have become popular, they are NOT binding on either the college-bound student-athlete or the school.